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The Australian National University

The Relationship between Intelligence and Policy-making in National Security

CVE

There is increasing need for enhanced interaction between intelligence providers and policy-making officials in the national security community. For this to be effective, practitioners on both sides must understand the responsibilities, challenges and skills of intelligence providers and policy officials. This practical course identifies the relevant issues facing participants and their organisations.

You will learn about the roles and functions of intelligence and policy, issues of boundary, role ambiguity and confusion, and what constitutes good intelligence in support of decision-making. The course covers the policy and political dimensions of responding to intelligence assessments, and case studies of how the intelligence and policy communities have worked together (or could have collaborated better) to respond to specific issues and incidents. Current and former practitioners with significant expertise and practical experience in the intelligence and policy-making communities facilitate the discussions.

 

Course scope and content

The program will encompass, through interactive discussion, the identification of relevant issues facing the participants and their agencies. It wiill address:

  • the roles and functions of the intelligence and policy streams within Australia’s national security agencies and departments
  • the relationship between the intelligence and policy communities, including issues of boundary, role ambiguity and role confusion
  • what constitutes good intelligence in support of government decision-making
  • the policy and political dimensions of responding to intelligence assessments, and
  • case studies of how the intelligence and policy communities have worked together to respond to specific issues and incidents.

 

Course approach

This two day, non-residential course course is both intensive and interactive. The themes will be developed through presentations, facilitated discussion of case studies from recent Australian experience, review and group activity. A syndicate activity on the second day provides the opportunity to apply the themes addressed and knowledge gained to a specific scenario.  A concluding session will enable participants to reflect on and discuss how best to apply the knowledge and skills gained on the course to their roles in the national security community.

The program will encompass, through interactive discussion, the identification of relevant issues facing the participants and their agencies. The focus of this course is predominantly practical. Speakers will be drawn from the senior ranks of the public sector, academia and business. They will have significant expertise and practical experience in the intelligence and policy-making communities and the interfaces between them. They will use recent and current case studies to analyse the related issues, challenges and risks facing national security agencies and departments.

 

Outcomes you can expect from your participation

The course will enable you to:

  • critically examine and discuss the concepts and practice of intelligence and policymaking, their respective roles and the relationship between them
  • discuss the challenges of maintaining the independence of intelligence content while accepting the direction of intelligence collection and assessment by the policy community in order to serve the needs of government decision-makers
  • identify the limitations of intelligence in informing policy-making and of other factors and influences in decision-making
  • examine the benefits that the contributions of intelligence and policy professionals make to government decision-making, and
  • establish ongoing professional linkages with a diverse range of national security community representatives.

 

Who should attend the course?

This course is open to EL1 – EL2 (or equivalent) officers from national security agencies and departments.

This course is designed for Executive Level 1 and 2 officers from all national security agencies and departments who are working in either the intelligence or policy-making streams and who may have had limited exposure to and engagement with the other stream  - especially those who are likely to move into positions which require such engagement.

 

Next date and venue

21-22 March 2017
National Security College
Crawford Building #132
1 Lennox Crossing
The Australian National University

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Program details

This is a two day non-residential, fully-catered program.

An ANU parking permit will be supplied.

The fee for this course is $2,110 (GST exclusive) for Commonwealth participating agencies and NSC Partners. The open rate is $2,550 (GST exclusive). Please contact us for information about becoming an NSC Partner organisation.


Registration/nomination

Please send your nomination to nsc.epdnominations@anu.edu.au.

 

Download the course FLYER (PDF).

 

 

Updated:  19 January 2017/ Responsible Officer:  Head of College, National Security College/ Page Contact:  Web administrator, National Security College